Innovation

A Renewed Riverfront by Ryan Newman

John G. and Phyllis W. Smale Riverfront Park

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The John G. & Phyllis W. Smale Riverfront Park is located next to The Banks development in Cincinnati. This vibrant project is transforming downtown Cincinnati by creating a major civic space at the front door of the city. It is a park for the generations—a compelling recreational, entertainment, and leisure resource for the entire Greater Cincinnati community. As an initiative led by the Cincinnati Park Board, the park features fountains, walkways, gardens, event lawns, playgrounds, and restaurants.

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The design of the park was developed in phases, which began with identifying a park-wide strategy of graphic opportunities. These opportunities included park identification, directional signage, an informational site map, regulatory signage, donor recognition, and a visitor center. A marketing communications fundraising program was also developed to target potential supporters and other stakeholders within the local community. The program consisted of an inspirational folder, booklet, overview brochure, and animation, all designed to convey the vision for the park, highlight each of its key features, and build excitement throughout the community.

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 From Cincinnati Parks -  PDF

From Cincinnati Parks - PDF

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TEAM

Sasaki - Prime Consultant, Landscape Architect.
http://www.sasaki.com/project/83/cincinnati-john-g-and-phyllis-w-smale-riverfront-park/

KZF Design - Local Architect, Civil Engineer, MEP/Structural Engineer. Aquatic Design & Engineering - Fountain Mechanical. THP Limited - Waterproofing. RSE Associates - Structural Engineer. Rico Associates - Specification. Pine & Swallow Environmental - Urban Soils.
Kolar Design - Graphics

Cincinnati Parks
http://www.cincinnatiparks.com/smale-riverfront-park/

2016 - Cincinnati Design Awards - Project
https://www.cincinnatidesignawards.com/cda_entries/smale-riverfront-park/


Check out www.kolardesign.net for more information
on Cincinnati's Smale Riverfront Park


Cincinnati Children’s Clinical Sciences Pavilion by Ryan Newman

CINCINNATI CHILDREN’S CLINICAL SCIENCES PAVILION CASE STUDY


“An exceptional brand experience is brought to life throughout this magnificent new building and embodies our organization’s aspirations. It represents hope, the promise of discovery, and the potential to improve child health.”

-Michael Fisher, Cincinnati Children's President & CEO


When Cincinnati Children’s opened their new Clinical Sciences Pavilion it made a 14-story, 445,000 square-foot commitment to research, innovation, and collaboration. The Clinical Sciences Pavilion is located between the hospital’s main clinical care center and its companion research tower, the William Cooper Procter Pavilion. The positioning of this new facility is symbolic of its purpose which is to connect researchers and clinicians. It allows them to easily collaborate and translate innovations faster from the lab to the patient’s bedside.

Cincinnati Children’s invited Kolar, as a key partner of the multi-disciplinary design team, to envision a branded experience within the physical environment. The vision was to develop a space that inspires collaboration to drive innovation, build a sense of pride in the accomplishments of the organization, and create convenient, delightful spaces that encourage research trials participation.


Kolar began by seeking what makes Children’s research function unique. What we learned is nuances matter:

  • Participants in research trials are not motivated to participate in research the same way patients are motivated to seek care.
  • Pride is individualistic. To build pride, addressing the diverse value sets of the audience was imperative.
  • Providing opportunities to be heard, to give back, and to ask to participate can be very powerful tools in building awareness and brand loyalty.
  • Utilization of space is influenced both by the design and by an organization’s culture.

Equipped with these insights the team was able to define storytelling, brand building, wayfinding, donor recognition, positive distractions, and a comprehensive artwork program to meet the needs of the researchers, administrators, clinicians, patients, families, donors and visitors who utilize the space.

Within the research clinic, the registration and waiting space was designed to provide a functional and delightful experience for families. The spacious, open waiting area overlooks a sculpture garden within a serene outdoor setting. The focal sculpture symbolizes the transformation of ideas into reality that occur daily within this space. Child-friendly activities such as hidden “seek-n-find” animals, interactive games, and play zones provide a variety of choices for children, while plentiful charging stations near tables and banquets provide homework or work spaces for older children and adults during their visit.

The design of the staff spaces was carefully orchestrated by the architectural team to foster a culture of communication and information-sharing. In support of this, Kolar developed storytelling graphics that celebrate the history and accomplishments of the organization. Aimed to foster knowledge of the organization’s history as well as stimulate new conversations, these storytelling graphics engage staff and visitors throughout the building in static and digital approaches.

Throughout the building, Kolar curated a collection of over 600 works of art to inspire and lift those who utilize its spaces. A portion of the collection was created by engaging more than 350 students from local schools and approximately 144 patients, families, and staff. These participants were provided an opportunity to engage with professional artists/art educators in the co-creation of artwork displayed within the building. Through this approach, staff had an opportunity to have a hand in the creation of the new space; patients had an opportunity to give to others, and children within the community had an opportunity to learn about science and research.

In order for the full vision of the space to be realized, Kolar assisted Cincinnati Children’s in the development of a “welcome kit” to celebrate the opening of the new space and acclimate the occupants to the building’s unique amenities and desired culture.

Anyone who walks into the Clinical Sciences Pavilion can feel the spirit of innovation alive and thriving. When 400 researchers were asked if the new space conveys an image on par with the quality of care and research, a post-occupancy survey saw a 30% increase in the old space and the new one. As one staff member said, “I feel inspired when I walk in here every day, and I attribute this feeling of inspiration to my increased productivity and creativity in the past year.”

Within this new building, groundbreaking discoveries will be made that will change the outcome for children around the world. For the Kolar team, it will be immensely rewarding to see how the space enables the next generation of researchers to develop life-saving advancements in pediatric disease.


Check out www.kolardesign.net for more recently updated Healthcare Case Studies.


TEAM

Architecture & Interior Design
GBBN Architects

Architecture- Research Clinic & Dry Lab Planning
HDR Architects

Wet Lab Planning
Jacobs Consultancy

General Contractor
Messer Construction

Experience Consultant & Artwork Program
Kolar Design

Artwork Selection Committee
University of Cincinnati

Artwork Partner
ArtWorks

Artwork Partner
Marta Hewett

Artwork Partner
Art Design Consultants

Art Partner
Mary Ran Gallery

Art Partner
Sollway Gallery

Art Partner
McElwain Fine Arts

Art Partner
Pace Prints

Art Partner
Blue Spiral

Art Partner
Malton Gallery

12 Local Grade and High Schools

81 International Artists

 

SEGD @ DSE - 2017 by Ryan Newman

SEGD Branded Environments at the Digital Signage Expo 2017

Las Vegas, Nevada

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To fulfill our hunger for knowledge and seek out innovation, we attended the Digital Signage Expo again this year. Our team recognizes that the landscape of design (and really everything in our lives) is changing with the advancement of technology. The Digital Signage Expo (DSE) is an opportunity for us to remain on the forefront of innovation for our clients. Gaining knowledge in signage technology continues to strengthen our ability to create environments that communicate.

Our time at the DSE split between lectures, coordinated by the Society for Experiential Graphic Design’s (SEGD) Branded Environments event, and an exploration of the Las Vegas Convention Center showroom.  Within both segments of the expo, we were able to experience two different tones of voice on similar subjects. SEGD inspired through lectures from an experiential designer perspective.  This point of view was incredibly powerful when one such lecture enveloped project case studies into a larger social context of histories and current events to build best practice philosophies. Inversely, DSE exhibitors spoke from an informed technical proficiency which provided explicit detail.  

Beyond these different tones and incredibly advanced digital screens, we realized something amazing that we already do as a team; we engage in a deep dive with our clients to uncover their personal, unique needs and deliver beyond their expectations – always keeping the end user in mind.  

As soon as you enter the DSE showroom floor, it becomes clear that just about everyone has the capability to work with impactful digital signage, as it has become an industry standard.  It is easy to get wrapped up in the details of the technological bells and whistles and lose sight of the end user.  Harnessing big data and curating adaptable content allows a self-proclaimed digital expert to see beyond the plethora of digital screens flashing in the periphery. By integrating user research, consumer market knowledge and an overarching smart city approach, there are endless opportunities to not only create, connect and enhance but personalize and future-proof any user experience strategy by design.  


“Designers don’t make the future; they compete with it.  Design the behavior, not the brand.”

-Brian Collins, CCO and Co-Founder, COLLINS

Park and Trail Maps - Washington Post by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design and the entire project team are extremely honored to have the Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park included as part of this article by Kim Cook | AP in The Washington Post. Alongside Corbin Design, C&G Partners, Ecocreative and especially the National Park Service; we spend every day focused on enhancing the user experience both indoors and out. Take a moment to find out more about the thought and design that goes into developing integrated systems for park and trail signage.

What was your last great experience out on a trail or in a park?


"A LOT OF DESIGN GOES INTO THOSE HELPFUL PARK AND TRAIL MAPS"

This article by Kim Cook | AP originally appeared in The Washington Post on April 4th, 2017.

  This undated photo provided by C&G Partners and taken at the West Point Foundry Preserve in Cold Spring, N.Y. shows a freestanding trailhead which incorporates a cast-iron branding seal inspired by the original 1818 Foundry stationery logo, the site map and interpretive panels about early Cold Spring. The trailhead's mesh metal structure is filled with brick fragments taken directly from the Foundry ruins. The kiosk's canopy features laser-cut lettering identifying the Preserve. (C&G Partners via AP)

This undated photo provided by C&G Partners and taken at the West Point Foundry Preserve in Cold Spring, N.Y. shows a freestanding trailhead which incorporates a cast-iron branding seal inspired by the original 1818 Foundry stationery logo, the site map and interpretive panels about early Cold Spring. The trailhead's mesh metal structure is filled with brick fragments taken directly from the Foundry ruins. The kiosk's canopy features laser-cut lettering identifying the Preserve. (C&G Partners via AP)

"A hike in the woods or a stroll through a preserve or park can be enhanced by a good trail sign — one that is informative, easy to see, yet doesn't intrude on the vista."

"It's a lot to ask of a sign designer."

'"A wayfinding sign should be apparent when you need it. But when you're not looking for directional information, its aesthetics should complement the environment so that it'll feel as though it belongs there,' says Jeff Frank, lead designer at Corbin Design in Traverse City, Michigan."

Read Kim's entire article at online - The Washington Post


Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park

What if a park by design could teach equality and respect for all cultures, encourage people of all ages and backgrounds to meet and interact, and use art, ecology and garden to express universal ideals of peace and friendship? The design of Cincinnati's Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park, named in honor of the city's first African-American mayor and foreign ambassador, emphasizes the things that bring people together. The park was envisioned to give life and purpose to an underutilized strip of land along the Ohio River.

A multidisciplinary team of landscape architects, architects, environmental graphic designers, and artisans collaborated throughout the design creation process. From a local perspective, the park needed to honor local river ecology, connect riverfront parks and trails, and highlight the city's international relationships. From a global perspective, the park needed to honor and celebrate cultures. The concept of the park celebrates the natural linear river setting by creating a "friendship bracelet" with charms on the bracelet as major features.


TEAM

Architecture/Interior Design
Fearing & Hagenauer

Brand Experience
Kolar Design
Siebert Design

Fabrication
Geograph Industries

Landscape Architecture
EDAW
Human Nature


Check out www.kolardesign.net for more information
on Cincinnati's First International Friendship Park


THE YEAR OF INSIGHTS & INNOVATION by Ryan Newman

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in·no·va·tion

ˌinəˈvāSH(ə)n/

noun

noun: innovation

a new method, idea, product, etc.

Dear Friends, Colleagues, Clients and Team,

In 2017 we will be taking our company to the next level. Together we have reached new heights with our most innovative team ever. I’m immensely proud of the work that we are doing to make our firm a force for “insights and innovation”.  

We are passionate about finding new and better ways to connect people, places, and brands—from healing environments focused on the patient and family experience to global workplaces that blend corporate and cultural identity. You can find our work in mixed-use development, where place-making is breathing life into urban areas; in city parks that have become the heart of communities; and in academic settings, where shifting populations and new technologies are redefining education. Our team is driven by the belief that great design is transformative, that environments can be an agent of change for people, brands, and business. We design to remind people why they do what they do every day, to change a culture and, sometimes, even to change lives.

The success of our company was built on innovation. We have embraced it in everything we do, from digital integration to enhance the user experience, to developing metrics and insights on the impact of space on people. We are pioneering new technologies in our projects, and also developing design research methodologies to enhance the lives of our communities at the intersection of people and place.    

I could not be more excited about what’s in store for this year, and for the opportunity to work with all of you to accelerate our year of insights + innovation!

ONWARD!

Kelly Kolar - President & Founder

CDA Awards 2016 by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design proudly accepted three prestigious SEGD awards at the 20th annual Cincinnati Design Awards (CDAs) event held locally at the Woodward Theater on November 11.

Kolar’s team swept the SEGD Built Work category, receiving design awards for Cincinnati Children’s Liberty Expansion (Mention - Design firm), Cincinnati Children’s Proton Therapy Center (Merit Award – Design firm), and Procter & Gamble, Geneva Business Center (Honor – Design firm).

“Universe”, the theme for the 4th floor inpatient expansion project at Cincinnati Children’s Liberty campus, was selected for its appeal to pediatric patients as well as its ability to provide tangible positive motivation for patients to get well and then apply learnings/seek new discoveries in the outside world once discharged. Within the patient rooms, sky-like graphic ceiling tiles contain hidden objects providing a 'seek-n-find' game-like distraction for patients. Professional artwork throughout the unit also integrates in theme and color to support the overall concept of the space.

Cincinnati Children’s Proton Therapy Center, providing the most progressive treatments for children and young adults with cancers and leukemias, is one of only two pediatric proton facilities in the country, and the only one with a research program. Treatment visits are scheduled daily for multiple weeks at a time, resulting in unique bonding between and support needs for families. Within the facility, a series of “gardens” were created to support these needs and to transform this medical facility into a warm, welcoming environment. In the Celebration Garden, a grove of trees along a winding river path adorn the route as families leave the treatment area. Each tree cradles a set of chimes that are rung to commemorate a milestone in the patient’s treatment.

Building a brand, globally was the project narrative for the Procter & Gamble, Geneva Business Center. As the world’s largest consumer products company, it was important for its global workplaces and tiered signature sites to communicate P&G’s new corporate brand to employees, customers, and shareholders. Brand strategy included moving to an open, agile office concept to create new spaces based on work styles and the various changing needs of an employee throughout the day. Whether it's quiet time in the "Biblioteque-Library" or gathering in one of the 6 workplace cafes for a cappuccino with co-workers, the space evolves to meet the need. A team of architects, interior designers and brand experience designers collaborated to successfully create a physical extension of the brand for the new prototype of the future workplace.

“Kolar is honored to have won three SEGD awards at the CDA now in its 20th year. We appreciate the acknowledgement of our work with our clients and partners in the creative community locally and internationally."
Kelly Kolar - President

In addition to receiving the awards, Kolar re-designed the new brand for the CDA to include a new dimensional logo, fresh color palette and transparent layering. Brent Beck was the lead designer on the project and said, “The new brand represents our region’s seamless inter-disciplinary creative community.  They are shaping the future of our city for generations to come.”


The Cincinnati Design Awards (CDA) program recognizes the best built-environment design produced by Cincinnati area creative firms and promotes the social and economic value of good design in our community. Each year, a distinguished nationwide jury of design thought leaders and eminent practitioners presents the awards to submitted projects created by local architecture, interiors, landscape, and experiential graphic designers.

Across all categories, CDA award winners represent cutting-edge creative work that is sensitive to global contemporary design trends, social good, positive ecology and energy stewardship, resourceful client-centered solutions, and dynamic aesthetics.

www.cincinnatidesignawards.com/about/


Just prior to the CDA Awards banquet, Kolar Design hosted SEGD's first “Conversations with Clive” event with the Cincinnati Chapter (https://segd.org/chapters/Cincinnati). On November 10, a collective of thirty designers, fabricators, educators, and digital media representatives engaged in conversation with SEGD CEO Clive Roux, and each other, about where the organization's focus has led the community thus far, in addition to what is happening in the design schools and the professional community. Clive presented the organization’s “what’s next?” goals and gave insights into the model for our future website. The SEGD Strategic Plan 2015-2018, outlined by Clive and the Board, states that SEGD should “Become a vital tool for the profession.” In order to educate and inspire, 50% of the focus should be on network/face-to-face events and 50% focus on informing, through the website. A lot of time and research has gone into understanding our membership base, how we currently use the website and tools, and the “specialties” that our member firms are marketing themselves as an offering. A good portion of the conversation was geared toward Experiential Design and cross-disciplinary education as well.

 


 

CAC - FREE by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design was asked to help celebrate a very special occasion with both interior and exterior installations.

“On February 12, 2016, as a "Love Gift" to the city for St. Valentine’s weekend, the Contemporary Arts Center will open its galleries to everyone for free. No more admission charges. The date coincides with the opening of the powerful exhibition by Korean artist Do Ho Suh.

The end of admission fees at the Contemporary Arts Center arrives thanks to a gift of $75,000 from The Johnson Foundation and $150,000 from a newly formed Contemporary Arts Center patron’s circle known as The 50. Together, they will subsidize free admission for at least three years.

Johnson Foundation President and CEO Amy Goodwin and her husband, Jody Bunn, are the first benefactors to join The 50 with a personal donation.

Raphaela Platow, director of the Contemporary Arts Center and a charter member of The 50,  said she has been working on the idea of free admission supported by a new group of younger donors for years and is delighted it has come to fruition now.  “Since our lobby renovation that created one of the most used community spaces in downtown, we have strategized about offering free admission. This single change will send a clear message that all are welcome, and would open the doors to countless visitors who might not otherwise experience contemporary art in Cincinnati.’”

Over 1,300 people attended the opening weekend. Kolar Design was extremely honored to play a part in the celebration.

CONCEPT PRESENTATION

SOCIAL MEDIA