Civic

A Renewed Riverfront by Ryan Newman

John G. and Phyllis W. Smale Riverfront Park

civic_smale_riverfront_park_slider_img2.jpg
Smale_Riverfront_Park_-_panoramio.jpg

The John G. & Phyllis W. Smale Riverfront Park is located next to The Banks development in Cincinnati. This vibrant project is transforming downtown Cincinnati by creating a major civic space at the front door of the city. It is a park for the generations—a compelling recreational, entertainment, and leisure resource for the entire Greater Cincinnati community. As an initiative led by the Cincinnati Park Board, the park features fountains, walkways, gardens, event lawns, playgrounds, and restaurants.

8737237620_cb76c38b8c_b.jpg
21703847284_ae70b87430_b.jpg
civic_smale_riverfront_park_slider_img1.jpg

The design of the park was developed in phases, which began with identifying a park-wide strategy of graphic opportunities. These opportunities included park identification, directional signage, an informational site map, regulatory signage, donor recognition, and a visitor center. A marketing communications fundraising program was also developed to target potential supporters and other stakeholders within the local community. The program consisted of an inspirational folder, booklet, overview brochure, and animation, all designed to convey the vision for the park, highlight each of its key features, and build excitement throughout the community.

SRP_MAP_20170710_Page_1.jpg
 From Cincinnati Parks -  PDF

From Cincinnati Parks - PDF

aerial_smale.jpg

TEAM

Sasaki - Prime Consultant, Landscape Architect.
http://www.sasaki.com/project/83/cincinnati-john-g-and-phyllis-w-smale-riverfront-park/

KZF Design - Local Architect, Civil Engineer, MEP/Structural Engineer. Aquatic Design & Engineering - Fountain Mechanical. THP Limited - Waterproofing. RSE Associates - Structural Engineer. Rico Associates - Specification. Pine & Swallow Environmental - Urban Soils.
Kolar Design - Graphics

Cincinnati Parks
http://www.cincinnatiparks.com/smale-riverfront-park/

2016 - Cincinnati Design Awards - Project
https://www.cincinnatidesignawards.com/cda_entries/smale-riverfront-park/


Check out www.kolardesign.net for more information
on Cincinnati's Smale Riverfront Park


Park and Trail Maps - Washington Post by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design and the entire project team are extremely honored to have the Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park included as part of this article by Kim Cook | AP in The Washington Post. Alongside Corbin Design, C&G Partners, Ecocreative and especially the National Park Service; we spend every day focused on enhancing the user experience both indoors and out. Take a moment to find out more about the thought and design that goes into developing integrated systems for park and trail signage.

What was your last great experience out on a trail or in a park?


"A LOT OF DESIGN GOES INTO THOSE HELPFUL PARK AND TRAIL MAPS"

This article by Kim Cook | AP originally appeared in The Washington Post on April 4th, 2017.

  This undated photo provided by C&G Partners and taken at the West Point Foundry Preserve in Cold Spring, N.Y. shows a freestanding trailhead which incorporates a cast-iron branding seal inspired by the original 1818 Foundry stationery logo, the site map and interpretive panels about early Cold Spring. The trailhead's mesh metal structure is filled with brick fragments taken directly from the Foundry ruins. The kiosk's canopy features laser-cut lettering identifying the Preserve. (C&G Partners via AP)

This undated photo provided by C&G Partners and taken at the West Point Foundry Preserve in Cold Spring, N.Y. shows a freestanding trailhead which incorporates a cast-iron branding seal inspired by the original 1818 Foundry stationery logo, the site map and interpretive panels about early Cold Spring. The trailhead's mesh metal structure is filled with brick fragments taken directly from the Foundry ruins. The kiosk's canopy features laser-cut lettering identifying the Preserve. (C&G Partners via AP)

"A hike in the woods or a stroll through a preserve or park can be enhanced by a good trail sign — one that is informative, easy to see, yet doesn't intrude on the vista."

"It's a lot to ask of a sign designer."

'"A wayfinding sign should be apparent when you need it. But when you're not looking for directional information, its aesthetics should complement the environment so that it'll feel as though it belongs there,' says Jeff Frank, lead designer at Corbin Design in Traverse City, Michigan."

Read Kim's entire article at online - The Washington Post


Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park

What if a park by design could teach equality and respect for all cultures, encourage people of all ages and backgrounds to meet and interact, and use art, ecology and garden to express universal ideals of peace and friendship? The design of Cincinnati's Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park, named in honor of the city's first African-American mayor and foreign ambassador, emphasizes the things that bring people together. The park was envisioned to give life and purpose to an underutilized strip of land along the Ohio River.

A multidisciplinary team of landscape architects, architects, environmental graphic designers, and artisans collaborated throughout the design creation process. From a local perspective, the park needed to honor local river ecology, connect riverfront parks and trails, and highlight the city's international relationships. From a global perspective, the park needed to honor and celebrate cultures. The concept of the park celebrates the natural linear river setting by creating a "friendship bracelet" with charms on the bracelet as major features.


TEAM

Architecture/Interior Design
Fearing & Hagenauer

Brand Experience
Kolar Design
Siebert Design

Fabrication
Geograph Industries

Landscape Architecture
EDAW
Human Nature


Check out www.kolardesign.net for more information
on Cincinnati's First International Friendship Park


CDA Awards 2016 by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design proudly accepted three prestigious SEGD awards at the 20th annual Cincinnati Design Awards (CDAs) event held locally at the Woodward Theater on November 11.

Kolar’s team swept the SEGD Built Work category, receiving design awards for Cincinnati Children’s Liberty Expansion (Mention - Design firm), Cincinnati Children’s Proton Therapy Center (Merit Award – Design firm), and Procter & Gamble, Geneva Business Center (Honor – Design firm).

“Universe”, the theme for the 4th floor inpatient expansion project at Cincinnati Children’s Liberty campus, was selected for its appeal to pediatric patients as well as its ability to provide tangible positive motivation for patients to get well and then apply learnings/seek new discoveries in the outside world once discharged. Within the patient rooms, sky-like graphic ceiling tiles contain hidden objects providing a 'seek-n-find' game-like distraction for patients. Professional artwork throughout the unit also integrates in theme and color to support the overall concept of the space.

Cincinnati Children’s Proton Therapy Center, providing the most progressive treatments for children and young adults with cancers and leukemias, is one of only two pediatric proton facilities in the country, and the only one with a research program. Treatment visits are scheduled daily for multiple weeks at a time, resulting in unique bonding between and support needs for families. Within the facility, a series of “gardens” were created to support these needs and to transform this medical facility into a warm, welcoming environment. In the Celebration Garden, a grove of trees along a winding river path adorn the route as families leave the treatment area. Each tree cradles a set of chimes that are rung to commemorate a milestone in the patient’s treatment.

Building a brand, globally was the project narrative for the Procter & Gamble, Geneva Business Center. As the world’s largest consumer products company, it was important for its global workplaces and tiered signature sites to communicate P&G’s new corporate brand to employees, customers, and shareholders. Brand strategy included moving to an open, agile office concept to create new spaces based on work styles and the various changing needs of an employee throughout the day. Whether it's quiet time in the "Biblioteque-Library" or gathering in one of the 6 workplace cafes for a cappuccino with co-workers, the space evolves to meet the need. A team of architects, interior designers and brand experience designers collaborated to successfully create a physical extension of the brand for the new prototype of the future workplace.

“Kolar is honored to have won three SEGD awards at the CDA now in its 20th year. We appreciate the acknowledgement of our work with our clients and partners in the creative community locally and internationally."
Kelly Kolar - President

In addition to receiving the awards, Kolar re-designed the new brand for the CDA to include a new dimensional logo, fresh color palette and transparent layering. Brent Beck was the lead designer on the project and said, “The new brand represents our region’s seamless inter-disciplinary creative community.  They are shaping the future of our city for generations to come.”


The Cincinnati Design Awards (CDA) program recognizes the best built-environment design produced by Cincinnati area creative firms and promotes the social and economic value of good design in our community. Each year, a distinguished nationwide jury of design thought leaders and eminent practitioners presents the awards to submitted projects created by local architecture, interiors, landscape, and experiential graphic designers.

Across all categories, CDA award winners represent cutting-edge creative work that is sensitive to global contemporary design trends, social good, positive ecology and energy stewardship, resourceful client-centered solutions, and dynamic aesthetics.

www.cincinnatidesignawards.com/about/


Just prior to the CDA Awards banquet, Kolar Design hosted SEGD's first “Conversations with Clive” event with the Cincinnati Chapter (https://segd.org/chapters/Cincinnati). On November 10, a collective of thirty designers, fabricators, educators, and digital media representatives engaged in conversation with SEGD CEO Clive Roux, and each other, about where the organization's focus has led the community thus far, in addition to what is happening in the design schools and the professional community. Clive presented the organization’s “what’s next?” goals and gave insights into the model for our future website. The SEGD Strategic Plan 2015-2018, outlined by Clive and the Board, states that SEGD should “Become a vital tool for the profession.” In order to educate and inspire, 50% of the focus should be on network/face-to-face events and 50% focus on informing, through the website. A lot of time and research has gone into understanding our membership base, how we currently use the website and tools, and the “specialties” that our member firms are marketing themselves as an offering. A good portion of the conversation was geared toward Experiential Design and cross-disciplinary education as well.

 


 

BEER LABEL by Ryan Newman

A COMMUNITY COLLABORATION

Brand collaborations have become an increasingly popular way to invigorate innovation as it allows brands to leverage their equity while engaging with totally new audiences. The fashion industry has embraced this idea with arms wide open. Target has proven a frontrunner collaborating with big name labels like Proenza Schouler, Liberty of London, and Marimekko. In one example, Target’s collaboration with Lily Pulitzer last spring was reported to have sold out in stores nationwide within minutes of opening its doors at 6:30AM. This success is just one representation of what collaborating can do for a business.

The notion of public-private collaborations (PPC) is not a new one. However, the way these collaborations come to life is what makes them stand out. As a whole, PPC’s are becoming more readily accepted because the partnership enables the knowledge, resources, and creativity of diverse community stakeholders to be harnessed.

INSPIRATION

 

american craft beer calls for label design ingenuity and style unmatched by large, domestic brands.

With the craft beer industry booming and information about it more readily accessible to consumers than ever before, creating a remarkable beer label design is imperative. It is no longer just a picture of your founder or some frosted mountains thrown on a can. That label and brand become important for someone from that hometown – the Rhinegeist logo can be spotted by a majority of people from Cincinnati and the overall state of Ohio. These labels go beyond just representing the beer, but also embody the city. The beer industry took a right turn with its shift to craft beer, and their labels followed suit by creating these unique stories that captivate their consumers beyond the scope of domestic beers.

progress is brewing

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. (DCI) is a local organization working to build a more dynamic metropolitan center at the heart of the Cincinnati region. In honor of their 21st year, it seemed fitting to capitalize on the craft beer renaissance happening, not only nationwide but specifically, in the Greater Cincinnati Region. Kolar through Ralok jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with both DCI and Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. in order to create a craft beer label to promote DCI's annual meeting. 

Rather than slapping the word “light” on a standard label, for instance, microbreweries aim to establish a distinct brand identity upon the introduction of each new brew. Think of it like this: labels have a major influence on the perceived quality of craft beer; therefore, these brewers (including home-brewing aficionados like me) aim to create craft labels. Craft beers look past the idea of “don’t judge a book by its cover” – in fact, the label can further connect their audience with an engaging story.

.

 

FINAL DESIGN

CAC - FREE by Ryan Newman

Kolar Design was asked to help celebrate a very special occasion with both interior and exterior installations.

“On February 12, 2016, as a "Love Gift" to the city for St. Valentine’s weekend, the Contemporary Arts Center will open its galleries to everyone for free. No more admission charges. The date coincides with the opening of the powerful exhibition by Korean artist Do Ho Suh.

The end of admission fees at the Contemporary Arts Center arrives thanks to a gift of $75,000 from The Johnson Foundation and $150,000 from a newly formed Contemporary Arts Center patron’s circle known as The 50. Together, they will subsidize free admission for at least three years.

Johnson Foundation President and CEO Amy Goodwin and her husband, Jody Bunn, are the first benefactors to join The 50 with a personal donation.

Raphaela Platow, director of the Contemporary Arts Center and a charter member of The 50,  said she has been working on the idea of free admission supported by a new group of younger donors for years and is delighted it has come to fruition now.  “Since our lobby renovation that created one of the most used community spaces in downtown, we have strategized about offering free admission. This single change will send a clear message that all are welcome, and would open the doors to countless visitors who might not otherwise experience contemporary art in Cincinnati.’”

Over 1,300 people attended the opening weekend. Kolar Design was extremely honored to play a part in the celebration.

CONCEPT PRESENTATION

SOCIAL MEDIA